The man who wants to teach the world to code

Meet the Man on a Mission to Teach the World to Code
Issie Lapowsky, inc.com

Inc. magazine

Mar 4, 2013

Hadi Partovi wants to expand computer science education. Here’s how he got Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, and a few other famous friends to spread the coding gospel.

For entre­pre­neurs, the “aha moment” can co…

Meet the Man on a Mission to Teach the World to Code http://flip.it/ko9RY http://flip.it/0LfWo

If you’re going to do good science, release the code

Source Code
Source Code (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

If you’re going to do good science, release the computer code too | Technology | guardian.co.uk.

 

 

 

Quantum2: an innovative skills development program provided by the Information Professional Development Group at ProQuest

English: Diagram of technology-empowered profe...
English: Diagram of technology-empowered professional development for teachers. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Quantum2: an innovative skills development program provided by the Information Professional Development Group at ProQuest.

Interesting site for information professionals on setting up an information/KM center.

Knowledge Systems Institute Graduate School of Computer Science Bioinformatics

The Periodic Table of Bioinformatics by Eagle ...
The Periodic Table of Bioinformatics by Eagle Genomics Ltd. (Photo credit: dullhunk)

Knowledge Systems Institute :: Graduate School of Computer Science.

Bioinformatics degrees

University of Michigan College of Engineering & Computer Science

University of Michigan – Dearborn: College of Engineering & Computer Science.

Johnny Chung Lee – Human Computer Interaction Research

HCI Research Poster
HCI Research Poster (Photo credit: Sabrina.Mach)

Johnny Chung Lee – Human Computer Interaction Research.

This guy is amazing. He is in the HCI lab at Carnegie and has invented a 40 dollar electronic white board (They normally cost around 1-2k) as well as steadycam using off the shelf controllers from the Wii.

e-Science: Computers as Science

 

Recent articles have pointed to the shift in the view of computer science from “creating tools for scientists” to actually creating the science itself. It’s about oceans, stars, cancer cells, proteins and networks of friends. Ken Birman, a computer science professor at Cornell University , says his discipline is on the way to becoming “the universal science,” a framework underpinning all others, including the social sciences. An extravagant claim from someone with a vested interest? The essence of Birman’s assertion is that computers have gone from being a tool serving science — basically an improvement on the slide rule and abacus — to being part of the science.